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TTD works with the unions that represent flight attendants, pilots, mechanics, air traffic controllers, ramp workers, FAA maintenance employees and inspectors, customer service agents, and others to keep America’s skies safe and to protect the jobs and rights of aviation workers. TTD:

Demands that the FAA receive the funding it needs to fully staff the workforce that keeps our skies safe, such as safety inspectors, air traffic controllers and systems specialists, and to continue to modernize our Air Traffic Control system and other aviation infrastructure.

Urges the U.S. government to pursue international aviation policies that create middle class jobs and protect the rights of employees, to uphold longstanding limits on foreign ownership and control of U.S. airlines, and to fully enforce worker protections negotiated into trade pacts such as the U.S.-EU Open Skies agreements. 

Pushes legislators and regulators to implement mandates that hold foreign aircraft repair stations and their employees to the same safety and security standards as those imposed at domestic repair stations and to ensure that foreign repair stations receive adequate oversight. 

Fights for laws and regulations that promote the security of our airways and the safety of aviation passengers and workers, including rest and fatigue rules for flight crews, banning knives on planes, and limiting voice calls on commercial aircraft so that flight attendants can do their jobs and make sure flights remain safe and comfortable.

Opposes misguided efforts to privatize Transportation Security Officers that would put both workers and passengers at risk and turn the clock back to the pre-9/11 security regime that featured shoddy practices by contractors and substandard working conditions.

Encourages FAA adoption of clear and enforceable operating standards for Unmanned Aircraft Systems, or “drones,” before the widespread commercial use of drones is permitted.

Calls on lawmakers to issue regulations classifying lithium batteries as a Hazardous Material and put restrictions in place that minimize the risks stemming from transporting lithium batteries by air.

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